The Blackman’s Story: Part Two

 

The Blackmans Story: Part Two

1989

“The Central Park Five”

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In 2012 Sarah Burns and her husband David Mc Mahon released a documentary “The Central Park Five”. The content of this film focuses on racism in the media and how being black can be a strong factor for public opinion. Often one is judged guilty before proven innocent based on one’s skin color and gender. According to The New York Times, the attacks on the Central Park jogger and others in the park on April 19, 1989 were “the most widely publicized crimes of the 1980s.”

An important aspect of this case is that all five of the accused confessed to a number of crimes that had been committed that night, but none admitted to raping the jogger. However, four out of the five confessed to being an accomplice to rape…

They retracted their statement of guilt claiming that they had been intimidated, lied to and coerced into making false confessions.

Needless to say

They were convinced of most charges based on discrimination the case was headed by a malicious prosecutor. In 2003 the five convicted juveniles sued New York City for emotional distress caused by years of wrongful imprisonment.

2014

In Plain Sight

Eric Garner

9Surrounded by a sea of white officers and outnumbered, on July 17, 2014 Eric Garner was taken down by Officer Daniel Pantaleo in an illegal chokehold prohibited by the New York City Police Department.

“I can’t Breathe”

While lying face down on the sidewalk four officers restrained Garner, and he repeated “I can’t Breathe” eleven times. He lay unconscious on the side walk surrounded by officers who did nothing to assist him. In addition, upon arrival on the scene the EMT failed to carry out their duties because it was their judgement that Garner was still breathing.

A Death Sentence

The medical examiners final report on cause of death: the result of a chokehold compression of the neck, compression of chest and prone positioning during physical restrained by police.

The outcome: nevertheless there was no indictment of officer Pantaleo.

Being a black male seems to be reasonable cause for white officers to intimidate, harass, humiliate and arrest. Case in point, Officer Daniel Pantaleo is the subject of two civil rights suits. Pantaleo is accused of falsely arresting two black men in 2013 and order them to strip naked on the streets for a search. Police all over the country feel entitled to routinely stereotype and discriminate against Black men. They have been accused of being insensitive and too quick to use militarized tactics in response when dealing with the black communities.

There is no end in sight. Since the 1999 death of Amadou Diallo, 76 men and women of color were killed while in police custody. As long as injustice prevails against people of color… acting peacefully is impossible-we must continue to rise up.

 

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2 comments

  1. Mike Roach Jr

    Yosef Hawkins, Michael Brown, Rodney King, and the list goes on and on of countless brothers mistreated by those “sworn to protect and serve. All above and most mentioned in part 1 and 2 of this post have been cases where the evidence has been undeniable. However to the favor of the white officers the end almost always justify the means. So yes if you are wondering do black people still feel like racism still exists, you damn right we feel that way. We live it, see it, deal with it on every level most days if our lives.

    Like

    • whynot8floyd

      Thank you for your open and true feelings on this subject.
      I would like to clarify one point about “The ends justifying the mean.” If I understand this statement correctly,
      your saying that in the end, no matter what happens, the white officers will always come out on top, even when they are wrong.
      What really needs to be put in check is these officers behavior and the justice system that protects these racist officers.

      Like

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